Zig Said Chuck Said This…

“Attitude, to me, is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, the education, the money, than circumstances, than failure, than success, than what other people think or say or do. It is more important than appearance, giftedness or skill. It will make or break a company…a church…a home. The remarkable thing is we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we will embrace for that day. I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it. And so it is with you…We are in charge of our attitudes.”

— Charles Swindoll, quoted in “Daily Insights with Zig Ziglar”.

4 Choices You Make With Every Employee

“You don’t build a business–you build people–and then people build the business.”
— Zig Ziglar

“Good people are free because they contribute more to the bottom line
than they cost…Poor people are expensive.”
— Brian Tracy

Here are your 4 choices you can make with your employees:

#1: Choose your hires carefully.  Do they have the right technical skills? Do they have good character and positive attitudes?  Will they blend with your organizational culture?  Do they have good interpersonal skills?  Do they have great potential?  Does their professional mission align with the organization’s mission?  If the answers are “yes”, hire them.

#2: Choose to invest in your employee(s).  Help them recognize and develop their strengths.  Find a way to fill in gaps that are holding them back.  In other words, provide training, mentoring and accountability.  Zig Ziglar said, “The only thing worse than training employees and losing them is to not train them and keep them.”

#3: Choose to save $$$ by cutting the training budget. Waiting for spontaneous and accidental growth is a choice. However, you and your organization will eventually suffer the consequences of underdeveloped employees.

#4: Choose to get rid of the zombies.  Sometimes the only right choice is to get rid of the underachievers and disengaged employees.  If they aren’t worth your investment to transform them, don’t procrastinate. Let them go. Parting ways is doing a favor to both you and the employee.

Choose wisely and promptly!

EVERY Small Thing Matters!

I frequently talk about the small things that transform lives. I usually do so from a positive perspective. For example, a smile or a compliment can brighten someone’s day. Let’s turn it around and see if the principle also works in a negative manner. We’ll explore it with the following questions.

  • How many times does an adult have to use profane or vulgar language before a child mimics the words?
  • How many times must a person drink and drive before they cause a fatal accident?
  • How many acts does it take to start a bad habit?
  • How much LSD is too much?
  • How long does one second feel when you’ve already held your breath for 60 seconds?
  • How many times must we neglect or offend someone before they are hurt emotionally?
  • How long will “a donut a day” be a harmless habit?
  • Can you get a $4.00 car wash if you’re one coin short?
  • From Chris DiMarco’s perspective, how important was a centimeter when Tiger Woods ball sat still on the edge of hole #16 at the 2005 Masters’ Tournament before it eventually trickled in?
  • From silver medalist Milorad Cavic’s perspective how important was 1/100 of a second when Michael Phelps won the 100 meter butterfly event in the 2008 Olympics at Beijing?
  • How important is 1/10th of a grade point in a race to be Valedictorian.
  • How important could one more SAT point be on an application to Harvard University?
  • How important is one punctuation mark?
    • I’m sorry I love you.
    • I’m sorry; I love you.

Is there an element of luck, good or bad, in the outcomes of these small matters? Perhaps sometimes, but I believe our chosen actions, at the very least, play with probability even when they don’t directly determine results. Instead of assuming we’re merely on the receiving side of luck, we should ask, “What did I do to shift the odds in my favor?  What will I do differently the next time to assure a more positive outcome?”

Zig Ziglar said, “Every choice you make has an end result.” Our beliefs, attitudes and actions are choices that influence outcomes.  He also said, “The choice to have a great attitude is something that nobody or no circumstance can take from you.” These choices, whether one-and-done or habitual, are real regardless of whether the matter at hand is small or large; positive or negative; important or irrelevant.

What choices will you make today with greater care than yesterday?  Visit www.CrossAbilities.com to see available choices waiting for you to decide.

How Hungry Are You?

Unpleasant hunger pangs, that growling stomach discomfort and awareness of sagging energy, are physical reminders that our bodies need to be refueled.  But what about our minds? Do people have a signal like an inner voice that urges them to nourish their minds and hearts? I believe some do – perhaps not everyone.

Based on my observation of human behavior it would seem whatever that voice is saying is gentler than the voice of a grinding stomach and no match for human stubbornness. However, there are some who discover a way to align their free will with their whispering conscience. A person like this responds by making good choices about feeding their body and mind and heart and spirit. No matter how crazy life gets, they are prepared at every level and able to restore balance.

Here’s what I know – people need nourishment and exercise to be healthy and happy and they know it. Still, they are inconsistent in both areas.  Tragic as this is culturally, we are significantly more neglectful about mental, emotional, creative and spiritual health.  How else can we explain the people problems that exist in every sector of society?

Here are estimates on what America spends in a year on our bodies and our physical appearances:

  • Food: Nearly $1.35 Trillion (USDA-2013)
  • Cosmetics: Nearly $60 billion
  • Tattoos: $3 Billion
  • Surgical and nonsurgical cosmetic procedures: $12 billion
  • Fitness Industry: $40 billion
  • Hair, nails & tanning: $10 billion
  • Fashion: $250 billion
  • TOTAL: $1,745,000,000,000 ($1.745 Trillion)

Now, look at how we as a nation, after formal education, continue our personal and professional development.  Businesses and other organizations spent an estimated $55.4 billion on training in 2014.  (That’s less than $25/month per American adult.)  As the numbers show, it’s a tiny fraction of what we spend on our bodies. The ratio is approximately 97 to 3 in favor of the body.  The difference becomes even more dramatic when we add the cost of repairing our broken bodies (i.e. health care.)  Maybe if we invested more wisely, focusing more intentionally on our inner selves, we would make different choices for our outer selves.

Human bodies are like a mobile home.  It’s where a person can reside and a vehicle that moves the person from one place to another.  In these ways, the mobile home is very useful.  Therefore, we need to take good physical care of it.  However, if the person inside is neglected to the point of starvation, what’s the point of the mobile home?

None of these thoughts are intended to place moral judgments on tattoos or nice clothes nor are they to suggest we neglect our bodies.  The lesson is about prioritization. I believe Americans would be healthier, happier and more productive if we would invest more in the person inside.  This suggests we probably need to redirect some of our resources.  Oh NO!

Here’s the good news.  You can do this and you don’t have to wait until the next January 1st, spend a fortune or give up everything that is fun!  You can begin one new practice — today that will put you on a path to a better life.  Ask your self, “What could I read to get started?  What could I sign up for?  What wisdom could I seek?  Who could I reach out to for the help I need?  However, the first question you need to ask yourself I this, “Am I hungry enough to change my diet today?”

The body is a home for people.
We are wise to take good care of ours.
But if we don’t care for the person who lives there,
what’s the point? 
— Clancy Cross