What’s In a Name?

“What’s in a name? That which we call a rose by any other name
would smell as sweet.”
   — William Shakespeare

Where Do Names Come From?

Does a name really matter?  The Affordable Care Act was given its name before it was implemented and tested in the marketplace.  Based on this fact, one must conclude that the name was chosen either for its intentions and/or to influence public opinion.  What other reasons could there be?

What comes first, the name or the reason for the name?  I suppose a name can be arbitrarily assigned for no other reason than we need a word for it.  Even so, the name eventually takes on meaning and significance, sometimes more than the object itself.  The Cleveland Browns is a franchise consisting of players, coaches, supporting staff and stadium.  This includes the heritage and the name.  In 1995, when the owner made plans to move the franchise to Baltimore, the city threatened legal action.  The team name was so important that it became a major bargaining chip in the compromise that in the end, allowed the owner to move the team to Baltimore, but leave the name behind.

Names are assigned to something that is real or at least created in the mind.  I’m not aware of any situation where someone created a name first then set out to make something that fit it.  “Google!”  That’s a cool word.  I think I’ll make a Google this week, IF I can decide what it is.”

Business Development – A Confusing Name

Sometimes a name takes on brand new meaning even to the point where it has so many meanings that the name becomes confusing.  This brings us to the topic of the week: business development.  Some people associate it with the sales function.  Others would say business development is about building infrastructure or strategic business relationships.  Product development is another perspective. So which is it?

What you most often associate with business development probably depends on your personal perspective.  Here are two definitions that bring clarity to the name and accommodate our multiple perspectives:

“Business development is … the process of uncovering the “unknown unknowns” that can help to grow a company. The key is to focus on specific metrics that define growth for your business and then seek out the partnerships, people and products that increase those metrics.”
— Source:  www.businessinsider.com

“In 1997, the international Committee of Donors for Small Enterprise Development coined the term ‘business development service’ to describe services that improve the performance of the enterprise, its access to markets, and its ability to compete.  BDS includes training, counselling and advice, developing commercial entities, technology development and transfer, information, and business linkages.”
— Source: www.ilo.org

I like both of these definitions for their strong emphasis on people.  Even more, I like what Zig Ziglar said.  “You don’t build a business –you build people– and then people build the business.”

Clay Mathile, former owner of IAMS, once said this, “When you invest a dollar in a person, you get $10 back.  When you invest a dollar in a machine, you get $2 back.”

People are the intended beneficiaries of business development.  They are also the cause of it.  Therefore, business development is “of the people, by the people, for the people”.  Any activity that develops people is at the heart of developing business.  For this reason, I am proud to say that Wright Cross Performance Group, a company that develops people, is in the business development business.

CLICK HERE for business development opportunities the Ziglar Way!


 

How Is Productivity Like eBay?

Thinking about personal productivity brings to mind two words: efficiency and effectiveness. Efficiency is a quantitative measurement of production. Effectiveness is a qualitative concept comparing results within a standard of excellence.  Together they are known as “productivity.”

Whenever we talk about productivity, we are discussing the “currencies of life” such as money, time and human effort.  Until we evaluate the exchanges and trade-offs of these currencies we can’t intentionally make good decisions about our efficiency and effectiveness.  Let’s look at two of life’s currencies.

Time Isn’t Money, Time is Life

Time is our most precious currency because it’s irreplaceable.  We simply can’t create more time for ourselves.  Everyone has the same 24 hours in a day and we all have a limited total allocation, otherwise known as “lifespan.”  Furthermore, we cannot know with certainty how long that span is.

Conclusion: Whatever you trade away your time for better be worth the exchange.  In other words, is this a good deal?

What Will I Do for Money?

Just because people live in a free society with unlimited earning potential does not diminish the value of money. Think of what you gave up to acquire yours. At the very least, you traded away some of your precious time and energy. Some people also trade away their dreams, opportunities, relationships, and integrity for money.  Ouch!

Conclusion: Whenever you are considering a trade that involves money always ask, “Is this exchange in everyone’s best interest?”

As trainer, teacher, author and coach, I ask people to trade some of their money and time in exchange for an opportunity to have a better future.  This transaction is called an investment.  Whether the professional development opportunity is one of mine or from someone else, I encourage people to increase their capacity by investing in themselves on a regular basis.  Clay Mathile, former owner of IAMS, said this, “When you invest a dollar in a person, you get $10 back. When you invest a dollar in a machine, you get $2 back.

There’s something I know is true without question and has to do with personal growth and development.  It’s one of the facts of life.  Zig Ziglar explained it this way: “You are what you are and where you are because of what has gone into your mind. You can change what you are and where you are by changing what goes into your mind.”  This bit of wisdom begs the question, “What will I feed my mind today, this week, this month?”

Agree?  Then maybe I’ll see you at one of our development events sometime.  Information online HERE.

10 Incontestable Truths of Training and Development

“When you invest a dollar in a person, you get $10 back.
When you invest a dollar in a machine, you get $2 back.”

– Clay Mathile (Source: http://www.flyernews.com)

1.  People ARE your most valuable asset.  This is reality, not an empty cliché.  It’s time for more organizations to walk their talk.

“Let us cultivate our garden.” ― Voltaire

2.  People need maintenance and upgrades even more than machines do.  Retraining is maintenance.  Training is an upgrade.  Development is the next generation model.

“If you bought a million dollar machine,
would you use it continuously without inspections,
maintenance and upgrades?  Of course no
t!
Do you care as much about the upkeep of your people?”

3.  Training is NOT for everyone.  Only invest in the employees you intend to keep.  By the way, what about yourself!

“Floss only the teeth you want to keep.” ― Zig Ziglar

“A staff can be no better than the man it serves.” ―David Halberstam

4.  Development is NOT an event.  It’s a continuous, lifelong process, necessary for the health of both the organization and individual.

“No matter how good you get you can always get better,
and that’s the exciting part.”
― Tiger Woods

5.  The outcome of development is change.  Define your change objectives and inspect the results.

“When you reread a classic, you do not see more in the book than you did before;
you see more in you than there w
as before.” ― Cliff Fadiman

6.  Development is an investment, NOT an expense. Paying expenses keeps the doors open.  Investing opens new doors. Investments are for organizations that expect to be around for the long haul. In fact, investments make the long haul feasible.

“If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.” ― Derek Bok

7.  Training is a risk/reward proposition.  Like financial investments, the greater the risks, the higher the potential return.  Choosing the right training programs, the right participants and the right service provider reduces the risks AND increases the dividends.

“Necessity is the mother of ‘taking chances’” ― Mark Twain

8.  Development, like all planned change, is strategic.  Strategic thinkers do not put the training budget in the discretionary spending column. When organizational strategy is being discussed, smart thinkers give the training director a seat at the table.

“Change before you have to.” ― Jack Welch

“If you do not change, you can become extinct!” ―Spencer Johnson

9.  Training builds morale.  Investing in people demonstrates they have a future with the organization. To build a team of loyal, fully engaged, high achievers, hire the right people then invest in their development regularly.

“The mind is not a vessel to be filled, but a fire to be kindled.” ― Plutarch

10. The organization must lead if relevant development is to occur.  Use your influence to leverage the change your organization needs.

“Which came first: the change-ready company
or the change-ready employee?”
― Lorii Myers

www.CrossAbilities.com