The Value of a Ziglar Legacy Learning Experience

When you are aware of your thirst, you are already on the path toward dehydration.  Does that mean you are in grave danger?  Not necessarily!  However, it does mean that appropriate and prompt hydration is a good idea.

When we find ourselves mentally and emotionally thirsty it’s time for a different kind of action, such as: attending a Ziglar Legacy Event.  It just might be the first stage of a good idea that prepares you to become “healthier!”

The thought for today is…

…50 Reasons for Attending a Ziglar Legacy Event

During a Ziglar Legacy Event (or another similar engagement)
you just might…

  1. …learn something that’s new and life-changing.
  2. …be reminded of something valuable that you had forgotten.
  3. …be inspired like never before.
  4. …have fun!
  5. …discover an opportunity.
  6. …rediscover previous commitments you made to yourself.
  7. …meet the collaborative partner you’ve been looking for.
  8. …meet your next employee.
  9. …get a prospect referral.
  10. …make a positive impact on someone else.
  11. …set a positive example for someone else.
  12. …earn someone’s heartfelt testimonial.
  13. …take something home that you can share with others.
  14. …take home a book or recording for your own personal development library.
  15. …win a valuable door prize.
  16. …make a new friend.
  17. …discover an old friend.
  18. …reconnect with a former colleague.
  19. …inspire someone you meet.
  20. …encourage someone else.

    You might also…

  21. …spawn ideas for someone else.
  22. …take the first step of a new habit that changes your life.
  23. …discover what your career has been missing.
  24. …discover what your life has been missing.
  25. …discover what your team has been missing.
  26. …discover what your business has been missing.
  27. …discover your true purpose.
  28. …discover your true priority.
  29. …realize the value of a day away from the office.
  30. …learn a new skill.
  31. …practice a new skill.
  32. …change your perspective.
  33. …discover a hidden talent.
  34. …refine or restore a rusty talent.
  35. …realize that this event on this day was meant for you.
  36. …be challenged in ways that are new to you.
  37. …replace one of your limiting beliefs with the truth.
  38. …leave the event with renewed confidence.
  39. …overcome a fear.
  40. …clean up your stinkin’ thinkin’!

    You could even…

  41. …have a life-changing spiritual experience.
  42. …discover choices you never knew were available.
  43. …hear a powerful quotation.
  44. …hear an unforgettable poem, story or song.
  45. …discover how great it is to be around people who want to learn and grow.
  46. …rediscover how important it is to invest in yourself.
  47. …rediscover the facts of life.
  48. …return home with page-after-page of life-changing notes.
  49. …meet the perfect accountability partner.
  50. …shift into overdrive by a day full of “Aha’s!”

To identify the value.  Choose any three outcomes in the list above and ask yourself the following questions…

  • What would it mean to me personally and professionally to experience just three of these outcomes?  Would it be worth my investment of time and money?
  • What choices am I continually making that block me from the growth and development that will empower me to become the person I was meant to be?

Click Here to learn about personal and professional development opportunities.

Thoughts About Growth

It’s easy to learn and grow, right? How hard is it to slide an educational CD into the player and push the play button? Is it not just as easy to attend a workshop or read a book as it is to go fishing or watch TV? Throughout human history, there have never been more readily-available opportunities for learning and personal improvement than there are today.

At the same time, it’s just as easy to NOT do these things. In our culture of comfort and security, people more often learn passively by coincidence or by accident rather than strategically and intentionally. So, they end up with an MBA (Masters in Barren Activities) or an MFA (Masters in Fruitless Acts) from the “School of Hard Knocks.”

Growth is a change process that begins with a single step. Few types of change are more important than those related to learning and growth. I’m compelled to ask, what steps are you taking to become the person you were meant to be? How do you feel about your growth process?

“We began to realize that if we wanted to change the situation,
we first had to change ourselves. And to change ourselves effectively,
we first had to change our perspectives.”

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”, p. 18.

A growth program looks different for everyone. Yesterday I participated online in a Webinar. I also set aside 30 minutes to reread portions of a phenomenal book about leadership. Today, I will pick up where I left off in “E-Myth Mastery” by Michael Gerber. These kinds of development activities are helping me become more efficient, effective and balanced in my life and business. If it wasn’t working, I would have stopped years ago.

How do you approach your personal and professional growth? Maybe a good book is your next step. This week, many are mourning the death of Stephen Covey, the brilliant thinker, writer and teacher who gave us “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.” Have you read his book or listened to his audio recordings? If not, consider getting started today on adopting these seven habits.

1. Be Proactive

2. Begin With The End In Mind

3. Put First Things First

4. Think Win/Win

5. Seek First To Understand, Then To Be Understood

6. Synergize

7. Sharpen The Saw

How long has it been since you attended a workshop? Recently I attended workshops in Houston and Chicago, but you don’t need to travel that far. A small business owners’ workshop is coming to Dayton on September 20, 2012 featuring Tom Ziglar and Howard Partridge.  It’s called “Born to Win.”  Get the details and register at: www.HowardPartridge.com/borntowin/

“Never become so much of an expert that you stop gaining expertise.
View life as a continuous learning experience.”
— Denis Waitley (1933- )