Killing Time is a Felony (or Should Be!)

On the heels of a full-day workshop about personal productivity led by Michelle Prince, I was inspired to ask this question.  “With time being the precious commodity that it is, why do we treat it with such reckless abandon? ”  Maybe there should be a severe penalty for killing time.  Then it dawned on me.  Wasteful use of time is it’s own penalty, like burning money!  How can we stop doing this?   (Enter Michelle Prince.)

Time Blocking Means Scheduling What’s Important

Thinking back on what Michelle taught us about Time Blocking, I had another thought.  Imagine your favorite band is coming to town in two weeks and you’ve never heard them in-person.  You wonder, this can’t be the first announcement. How come I’m just now hearing about it?  While questioning your predicament you immediately go online desperately hoping that a few seats might still be available.  Hooray!  You discover two unclaimed adjoining seats near the back row.  Without hesitation, you break the all-time speed record for online purchases.

After a sigh of relief, you check your calendar to see if anything has to be rescheduled.  First things second, right?  But, maybe you aren’t the type to be caught up in the moment, meaning you had the good sense to check your calendar BEFORE buying the tickets.  Regardless, here’s the important question.  If something else was scheduled on the day of the concert, what would you do?  Remember, it’s your favorite band.  You would reschedule what’s important to make room for the concert.

My imagination continued to churn, this time in a different direction.  Suppose your favorite band had to cancel.  Would you clear your calendar until the rain check date was announced?  Of course not!  Yet, how many real opportunities do we miss because we keep our calendars open for unknown opportunities that might never happen?

Simple is as Simple Does

Productive people faced with an opportunity begin with one simple action.  They schedule what is important as soon as it appears on the radar screen and reschedule conflicting priorities as needed to keep them on the calendar.  Admittedly, this approach does fill the calendar quicker and occasionally requires cancelling a priority.  However, I would wager that this happens far less often than we fear.  The important thing to remember is this:

“What gets scheduled gets done.  What doesn’t get scheduled doesn’t get done.”
— Michael Hyatt

Scheduling forms the commitment.  What other behaviors do people exhibit when they are committed?  They tell people about their decision.  They invest money in it.   They visualize what it will be like.  They make plans.  They prepare.  Without these behaviors there is no importance and no commitment.  Sadly, they are left with one more option on the pile of discarded opportunities.  An unimportant opportunity rejected intentionally is sensible.  An important one missed by poor scheduling is tragic.

Self-Talk: The Enemy of Importance

Let’s look at an example of “importance.”  Is your family important to you?  What’s important to your family?  Certainly your time.  If you are the breadwinner in your family your income is important.  In turn, that would assign importance to your capacity to earn future income, which leads to your next question.  “What am I doing to protect and increase my capacity to earn a living for my family?”  You might discover that strategic investments in yourself are long overdue.  It’s time for action!

After this sort of reflection, expect your self-talk to jump in.  “I realize that I want and need this.  But, there’s plenty of time to make it happen so, I’ll revisit it when the time gets closer.  I’ll make a note to myself.  This way, if a better offer comes up, I won’t have to rearrange my schedule and apologize for canceling.  Besides, there will probably be other opportunities when I’m not so busy.  The benefits might have to wait.”

Truth #1: We Schedule What We Value.

When two conflicting opportunities collide, we schedule around them.  Scheduling is seldom an either/or proposition.  When we are creative, we can usually find a way to make both things happen.  Instead of sacrificing, we adjust.

Truth #2: It’s Easy to Confuse “Importance” with “Interesting.”

Success means giving preferential treatment to that which is important over that which is merely interesting.  The negative alternative is settling for interesting, low-value opportunities, including nothing at all.  Temptation is that seductive stimulus that preys on people’s inability to differentiate between importance and interesting.  As a result, people are drawn to what seems important in the moment,  but turn out to be less important, even harmful.  Successful people have the will and the skill to recognize what is truly important and make appropriate choices.  They do this by reprogramming their values to make the important interesting.

Truth #3: Most Important Things Can be Rescheduled.

Highly effective people routinely adjust their calendars.  Because they are committed to maintaining a full calendar based on their priorities, they will inevitably find competing priorities that conflict with one another.  They realize that productivity begins with a flexible calendar, filled with the most important opportunities.  If something is important enough to be on the calendar, it’s worth rescheduling to make room for other priorities.  This is a must-have attitude for enjoying a rich, highly effective life.

A Lesson in Flexibility

Here’s a question I’ve been asking myself and others more often.  Is life an endless series of either/or propositions?  For example, do we really have to choose between a customer appointment and an investment in ourselves?  Maybe, but probably not.  What if a customer wants to meet you on Friday morning?  If the requested day and time are open, you schedule it.  If not, you suggest a different time or adjust your calendar.  You have the power to choose.  So often we make things more complicated than necessary by imagining what the customer might think, say or do if we suggest a different time or have to call back to reschedule.  That’s fear speaking.  Instead of listening to the speculation of our imaginations, why not reach out to the customer and ask a question like this?  “Mr. Customer, I have a conflict.  Would it be inconvenient for you if we choose another time that works for you?  I have both an early and a late opening on Wednesday.  Would either of these be convenient?”

Here’s a real-life example.  It was Friday afternoon, several years ago when I called Chuck for an appointment to discuss a home-remodeling project.  I was the prospective customer.  Chuck was pleased to take my call and suggested Tuesday afternoon.  I explained, that was too late, because I already had a quote and a signed contract that would take effect on Tuesday.  I needed his quote before then.  After a brief pause, Chuck said, “I can be meet with you at 6:30 this evening.”  His professionalism and flexibility were key factors in earning my business.

Here’s the point.  I didn’t know what was on Chuck’s calendar — I did know what was on mine.  Here’s what I do know.  When we understood each others’ time parameters and priorities we were able to schedule an appointment with the help of importance-based time-blocking.

A Challenge for Change

How many opportunities do we miss because we don’t schedule what’s important?  How often are we afraid to reschedule an appointment assuming people will be upset by a rescheduling request?  Just maybe, the original appointment has become inconvenient for them, too and they would welcome your request to reschedule.  Does fear of the unknown drive our actions or have we learned that reasonable people will make reasonable adjustments?

Here are four challenge questions for you.

  1. Do you understand what is truly important to you and those in your circle of influence?
  2. Do you schedule first what is most important?  (see: Big Rocks)
  3. Are you willing to reschedule as needed to maximize your time according to your priorities?
  4. What will you do differently as a result of reading this and thinking about it?

CLICK HERE for opportunities that might belong on your calendar.

Optimize Your Optimism

The ABC’s of Professionalism

Do you remember Winnie the Pooh’s friends Tigger and Eeyore? These characters could be used to teach a seminar on optimism and pessimism.

“It’s snowing still,” said Eeyore gloomily.
“So it is.”
“And freezing.”
“Is it?”
“Yes,” said Eeyore. “However,” he said, brightening up a little, “we haven’t had an earthquake lately.”

— A.A. Milne (1882-1956), “The House at Pooh Corner”, p. 11.

Tigger: Come on, Rabbit. Let’s you and me bounce.
Rabbit: Good heavens! Me bounce?
Tigger: Why, certainly! Look, you’ve got the feet for it.
Rabbit: I have?
Tigger: Sure. Come on, try it. It makes ya feel just grrreat!

— Walt Disney’s “The Many Adventures of Winnie the Pooh” (animated film), 1977.

Probably the most familiar description of optimism is a comparison to its opposite using a glass that is half full of water. To the optimist it is half full – the pessimist sees it as half empty. Some hold a different understanding of these terms.

“We have been taught to believe that negative equals realistic and positive equals unrealistic.” — Susan Jeffers

If so, how can the very same glass be unrealistic to one and realistic to another? They are both the same glass of water. The view Jeffers describes could only originate from someone with the mindset that we live in a world where outcomes are generally unfavorable.

“The optimist proclaims that we live in the best of all possible worlds; and the pessimist fears this is true.” — James Branch Cabell (1879-1958), The Silver Stallion, 1926

By the way, what causes pessimists to think they need to “save” the optimists?

“An optimist may see a light where there is none, but why must the pessimist always run to blow it out? — Rene Descartes

An optimist, coming from a different emotional universe, has a more positive perspective. Good or bad, he makes the best of every situation and is more productive and happier because of it.

“A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.” — Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965)

“I will say this about being an optimist– even when things don’t turn out well, you are certain they will get better.” — Frank Hughes

“All the days of the afflicted are evil, But he who is of a merry heart has a continual feast.” — Bible, Proverbs 15:15

The current downturn and volatility of the stock market along with other economic uncertainty has many people stirred up to the point of panic. Not so with one of my optimistic friends who admitted to being behind in his long-term investment goals. He correctly recognized this situation for what it is – a HUGE opportunity to catch up. Stocks-based investments are on sale at 1989 prices!

An optimist goes on an adventure, while the pessimist stays home. Maybe this is a good thing. We need people to “mind the store” while the rest of us are out living life. Great leaders are optimists. Their optimism was not the result of their climb to the top — it was the cause. They go a step further, by their inspiration.

“For myself I am an optimist – it does not seem to be much use being anything else.” — Sir Winston Churchill (1874-1965), speech at the Lord Mayor’s banquet, London, November 9, 1954

“The American, by nature, is optimistic. He is experimental, an inventor and a builder who builds best when called upon to build greatly.” — John F. Kennedy (1917-1963)

“I’ve spoken of the shining city all my political life … in my mind it was a tall, proud city built on rocks stronger than oceans, windswept, God-blessed, and teeming with people of all kinds living in harmony and peace; a city with free ports that hummed with commerce and creativity. And if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. That’s how I saw it, and see it still.” — Ronald Reagan (1911-2004), Farewell Address, January 11, 1989

How can someone become more optimistic? It starts with a decision. Yes, it is possible to decide today to become more optimistic. Here are five steps to get you started.

1) Take a personal inventory — Write down all of your blessings. Focus only on the positive. If you’re pessimistic, you’ve spent enough time and effort dwelling on the negative. Post your list of blessings on your bathroom mirror, by your bed and other prominent places. Add to your list regularly.

“This is the day the LORD has made; We will rejoice and be glad in it.” — Bible, Psalm 118:24

“Praise the LORD! Oh, give thanks to the LORD, for He is good! For His mercy endures forever.” — Psalm 106:1

2) Seek God’s help daily — Develop your new positive attitude through prayer. Give thanks for each item on your list of blessings. Seek forgiveness for your mistakes. Ask God for strength, wisdom and guidance.

“He gives power to the weak,
And to those who have no might He increases strength.
But those who wait on the LORD
Shall renew their strength;
They shall mount up with wings like eagles,
They shall run and not be weary,
They shall walk and not faint.”

— Bible, Isaiah 40:29,31

3) Purge the negative thoughts — Throw away the negative stuff cluttering your mind. Write down your liabilities, barriers and excuses. Then tear them up and burn the pieces – literally! The next time you catch yourself thinking a negative thought, take a moment to remember that purging process.

“What then shall we say to these things? If God is for us, who can be against us?” — Bible, Romans 8:31

4) Fill your mind with positive thoughts — Without the negativity there is room for positive thoughts. Make good choices for what you read, listen to, and watch on television. Put driving time to good use — turn your car into a university on wheels. Even if you can’t feel it, your mind is hungry, too. Feed it daily!

“Pity the man who has a favorite restaurant, but not a favorite author.” — Jim Rohn (1930- ), Weekly Ezine, Issue 48 – July 26, 2000

“Before you change your thinking, you have to change what goes into your mind.” — Zig Ziglar (1926- )

5) Reinforce your positive thoughts — Start using positive language. Practice it until it becomes a habit.

Friend: “How’s it going?”
You: “OK, I guess.”

This type of response is no longer acceptable. Only words like good, great, and fabulous are worthy of an optimist.

“Repetition of the same thought or physical action develops into a habit which, repeated frequently enough, becomes an automatic reflex.” — Norman Vincent Peale (1898-1993)

Follow the program and you will enjoy the results. Here are some of the things you can expect from your new attitude:

“Once you replace negative thoughts with positive ones, you’ll start having positive results.” — Willie Nelson (1933- )

“Perpetual optimism is a force multiplier.” — Colin Powell (1937- )

“A strong positive mental attitude will create more miracles than any wonder drug.” — Patricia Neal (1926- )

“The positive thinker sees the invisible, feels the intangible, and achieves the impossible.” — Anonymous

“An optimist is the human personification of spring.” — Susan J. Bissonette

Have a fabulous day!

God bless,

— CC

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